Puppy FAQ's

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Question

How soon should my puppy go to the vet?

Answer

New puppies should go to the vet within the first three days after you get them. It is important to get your puppy examined and to ask the vet any questions that you may have to ensure that you are prepared for the responsibilities that come with a new furry family member.

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Question

What supplies will my puppy come with?

Answer

Your puppy will come with most things needed to get your journey together started. The Puppy Care Package will have a variety of toys, a blanket with their mothers scent, doggie bags, a pee pad for the trip home and a metal bowl along with a weeks worth of their current food. They will also come with a puppy collar that is meant to be worn out as they grow into their new collar. If given enough notice, we can customize and provide you with a ID tag that states your chosen name for your puppy (if there is one) and a phone number should your puppy get lost before they are microchipped.

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Question

How old does my puppy have to be until I can bring them home?

Answer

Puppies should stay with their mothers and littermates until they are at least 7 weeks of age. Time with their littermates is crucial to help them receive feedback on biting that is too hard or play that is too rough.

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Question

What supplies do I need to buy?

Answer

Your puppy will need a leash of some variety, even if you have a fenced in yard. Leash training in essential in socialization behaviors, and although retractable leashes are convenient, training is much easier with a standard rope leash. Once they have grown some, you can start to look for a sturdy collar or harness. At 8-12 weeks of age they will need a collar of approximately 7-10 inches in length. If you choose to incorporate crates into your puppies routine, we recommend not to go any smaller than a 24 inch crate, and we also suggest to consider adding a playpen if you're gone for extended periods of time or want to allow your puppy more freedom.

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Question

Is littermate syndrome real? How do you avoid it?

Answer

The short answer is yes. Littermate syndrome is when two or more puppies become more attached to each other than they are to their owner and it is very real. But it can easily be avoided by simply separating the two dos for most of the time. By separating them, you are allowing them to learn to cope without the other and you're giving them an opportunity to bond with you through training, play, or even nap time. The two dogs can still be around each other and play but you must make sure they are bonded to you first and foremost.

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Question

What treats should I use while training my puppy?

Answer

Our dogs are very food motivated, and therefore are enticed by something as simple as kibble. If your puppy finds kibble boring then consider some healthy substitutions, such as raw carrots, as a training tool. Treats that you buy at the store are definitely helpful, but take note of the fat content as very fatty, rich foods can lead to obesity and pancreatitis. Boiled chicken breast can also be a tasty treat, as long as it is boiled in plain water with no seasonings or added grease.